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Posted by on Jul 19, 2013 | 2 comments

Brand Evangelism vs.Youtilitarianism

Brand Evangelism vs.Youtilitarianism

In what do you put your marketing faith? My two personal favorite pieces of content I’ve created of late include A guest post on Mark Schaefer’s [grow} blog, and an extended version on Branding magazine, concerning whether or not brands can satisfy the core human need to believe and belong… whether they can truly rise to the level of importance in a person’s life that that person/consumer wants to convert others to belief in your brand. The official song and music video for Jay Baer’s new book “Youtility: Why Smart Marketing is About Help not Hype.”  In the first (which I almost titled An Ad Age columnist, Two Social Media Experts and a Rabbi walk into a bar… owing to the make-up of the interviewees), I got some often surprising, and uniformly emphatic, replies, ranging from… Q.  Can brands fill an existential void – satisfy the need to belong and believe? A. “Nope, not in the least. I think it’s gross overreach and evidence that marketers haven’t yet come to...

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Posted by on Jul 5, 2012 | 2 comments

Seek the Brand Truth and it Shall Set You Free, Free, Free – If You Act Now!

Seek the Brand Truth and it Shall Set You Free, Free, Free – If You Act Now!

I listen to a lot of podcasts, if only as a way to redeem all the chopped up bits of time I seem to have in my car. For business learning I tend to favor the unpolished enthusiasm of ‘casts such as the relatively new Mastering Social Business by Kelly Noble and Paul Serwin.  But I also listen to more established voices, including that of Mitch Joel and his Six Pixels of Separation. He and his guests typically have lot to offer, once you get past the self-congratulatory plugging of upcoming books or the hubristic backslapping of bright guys buying their own press. Is Your Brand All About the Truth? Speaking of books and hubris, a recent Six Pixels guest, Jonathan Baskin (prolific author, columnist, marketing consultant) caught my ear with this whopper of a comment: “I hate the word content…  We brand marketing folks don’t create content… we share truth.” Wow.  Brand marketers share truth (and content marketers, presumably, share something less). Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m...

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Posted by on Mar 16, 2012 | 0 comments

Can Employment Branding Create Too Much Brand Trust?

Can Employment Branding Create Too Much Brand Trust?

It’s a hot topic that goes by many monikers: employment branding, internal branding, corporate citizenship strategy, employee engagement. From a marketing perspective (and I won’t even get into the HR benefits here), it’s the logical – and necessary – extension of external branding, the organizational means by which positive brand experiences are created and core brand promises are kept. It recognizes that inculcating employees with brand values, and nurturing them as true brand believers, is the center of any sincere effort to be customer-centric. But can employee branding create too much employee belief, too much trust? A article in the Iowa Law Review answers a resounding, and potentially troubling, “Yes.” HAS IN-HOUSE COUNSEL CLEARED YOUR INTERNAL BRANDING? The article is “Managing Identity: Buying in to the Brand at Work,” by Marion Crain, a Wiley B. Rutledge Professor of Law and Director, Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Work & Social Capital, Washington University School of Law (and I thought corporate titles could be a little over done). For a...

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Posted by on Sep 16, 2011 | 3 comments

Can’t Buy Me (Millennial) Love: Brand Trust or Transaction, Part 2

In my last post, Brands as Functional Friends for Millennials, I opined on the potential to create brand trust, and subsequent loyalty, among Millennials by becoming functional friends, i.e., by actively providing useful resources and support. This is differentiated from the notion of “faux friends,” that is, brands that build excitement, if not real attachment, by being a part of the “gimme culture,” wherein your brand is only as good with its audience as its last offer, daily deal, freebie, or other “gimme.” (For more thoughts on that subject, check out Marketing to Millennials: Brand Trust or Transaction?) So I’m wondering where on that brand friendship spectrum you would place the involved parties featured in last Sunday’s New York Times article On Campus, It’s One Big Commercial. Can you sell more soap in an Ivory Tower? The piece talks about the growing, if not new, marketing practice of not merely reaching out to kids on campus but actually becoming part of institutionalized college life. Besides the well-established outreach of...

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Posted by on Aug 31, 2011 | 0 comments

Rust as Trust:  Using Essence of Place in Destination Branding

Rust as Trust: Using Essence of Place in Destination Branding

Copyklatsch is back from vacation… specifically, back from Sedona, Arizona, a spot regularly, and justifiably, included on lists of the world’s most beautiful places. It seems, then, only fitting to resume with some thoughts on destination branding (with which Creative on Call has some excellent experience), and to make this one of our “free coffee card” posts. Just make yours one of the first ten comments on this post and we’ll send you a free Starbucks coffee card. Enjoy! Ya’ gotta love academic studies (I run across a lot in my constant foraging for solid research on the nature and trends of trust in branding). Here’s a snippet from a current favorite, A Conceptual Model of Destination Branding out of the University of Massachusetts – Amherst: It is easily tempted to equate Luhmann’s third mode of trust to the conative component of image. In closer analyses of destination image studies where the conative component is identified, however, its definition is more aligned with that of attitude and attitudinal loyalty....

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